Justice K Kannan: It is so patent a position it requires no case law. After all, cases are made on what is contested or contestable. Nobody ever thought it worthwhile to take up what u r contending for!

[5/28, 18:52] Sekarreporter 1: [5/28, 18:46] K. Chandru Former Judge Of Highcourt: https://indiankanoon.org/doc/1331904/
[5/28, 18:47] K. Chandru Former Judge Of Highcourt: Patty please read sec66 of the Indian succession Act.That is why your leader got a will registered& bequeathed his Gopolapuram house to charities.He knows the law.
[5/28, 18:56] Sekarreporter 1: [5/28, 18:55] Justice K Kannan: It is so patent a position it requires no case law. After all, cases are made on what is contested or contestable. Nobody ever thought it worthwhile to take up what u r contending for!
[5/28, 18:56] Sekarreporter 1: 🙏🏾

Disclaimer Citedby 16 docs – [View All]Indian Succession Act, 1925Prem Lall Mullick And Ors. vs The Administrator-General Of … on 16 March, 1894Sunita Shivdasani vs Geeta Gidwani And Anr. on 8 February, 2007Kanwaljit Kaur Bedi vs Paramjit Singh Sawhney & Ors on 11 October, 2017Smt. Malli Sahuani Alias Sahu And … vs Khadali Swain And Others on 1 November, 2016
[Complete Act]

Try out our Premium Member services: Virtual Legal AssistantQuery Alert Service and an ad-free experience. Free for one month and pay only if you like it.Central Government ActSection 66 in The Indian Succession Act, 192566. Mode of making, and rules for executing, privileged Wills.—(1) Privileged Wills may be in writing, or may be made by word of mouth.(2) The execution of privileged Wills shall be governed by the following rules:—(a) The Will may be written wholly by the testator, with his own hand. In such case it need not be signed or attested.(b) It may be written wholly or in part by another person, and signed by the testator. In such case it need not be attested.(c) If the instrument purporting to be a Will is written wholly or in part by another person and is not signed by the testator, it shall be deemed to be his Will, if it is shown that it was written by the testator’s directions or that he recognised it as his Will.(d) If it appears on the face of the instrument that the execution of it in the manner intended by the testator was not completed, the instrument shall not, by reason of that circumstance, be invalid, provided that his non-execution of it can be reasonably ascribed to some cause other than the abandonment of the testamentary intentions expressed in the instrument.(e) If the soldier, 1[airman] or mariner has written instructions for the preparation of his Will, but has died before it could be prepared and executed such instructions shall be considered to constitute his Will.(f) If the soldier, 1[airman] or mariner has, in the presence of two witnesses, given verbal instructions for the preparation of his Will, and they have been reduced into writing in his lifetime, but he has died before the instrument could be prepared and executed, such instructions shall be considered to constitute his Will, although they may not have been reduced into writing in his presence, nor read over to him.(g) The soldier, 1[airman] or mariner may make a Will by word of mouth by declaring his intentions before two witnesses present at the same time.(h) A Will made by word of mouth shall be null at the expiration of one month after the testator, being still alive, has ceased to be entitled to make a privileged Will.

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