[5/21, 16:29] Sanjai Gandhi: https://www.google.co.in/amp/s/m.timesofindia.com/india/tamil-nadus-wood-carvings-pith-works-get-gi-tag-telanganas-telia-rumal-too-gets-status/amp_articleshow/75683891.cms [5/21, 16:31] Sanjai Gandhi: Thanjavur pith work, arambavoor wood carving, and Telia rumal GI granted by advocate Sanjai gandhi [5/22, 12:24] Sekarreporter 1: IndiaCoronavirus Cases In IndiaIRCTC Ticket BookingCyclone AmphanZones In Maharashtra TOI OPEN APP MORE FROM TOI Top News Mask India Covid-19 Updates INDIA Tamil Nadu’s wood carvings, pith works get GI tag; Telangana’s Telia Rumal too gets status A Subramani | TNN | May 11, 2020, 23:55 IST TNN Get Notifications on latest India News CHENNAI: Come Tuesday, two delicate handicraft products from Tamil Nadu – the Thanjavur Netti Works (pith works) and Arambavur Wood Carvings – will get the Georgraphical Indication (GI) from the GI registry. Tamil Nadu handicrafts department is the applicant on behalf of the artisans involved in the trade, said its counsel and IPR attorney P Sanjai Gandhi. Netti (pith) is obtained from a hydrophyte plant called Aeschynomene Aspera found in lakes and marshy lands around the Thanjavur region and Mannargudi. Traditionally and hereditarily artisans make models of the Brihadeeshwara Temple, Hindu idols, garlands, door hangings and decorative pieces. READ MORE FROM As workers prepare to trickle back into offices, here are strategies to keep the virus at bay, as well as guidelines if an employee tests positive SRK’s six-pack and Salman’s biceps got a lot of Indian men into the gym, but now even the boys want to be buff. Is this teen muscle mania about a good body or body image issues? The artefact is created out of the pith looks similar to the ones made in marble and elephant’s tusk. They shine elegantly but are brittle and break easily, unless kept carefully. Hence, most models are preserved inside a glass box. The arumbavur wood carvings is an art form and a temple architecture that draw inspiration from mythology and mythical deities. The Arumbavur artisans employ great skill in measuring geometric proportions and scale of wood and detailing required, from a single block of wood, for various wooden sculptures, from hand-sized carvings to temple chariots and temple cars. Temple cars and chariots are used to carry idols of Hindu gods. The artisans receive an abundant supply of fine wood from Pachamalai Hills and Thanjavur-Kumbakonam belt. Temple cars (rathas), pooja room interiors, designed doors, panels, temple flagstaff and images of gods are all made by Arumbavur artisans, who are, however, best known for their temple cars. The third product set to get GI recognition on Tuesday is Telia Rumal, which made the Yadadri Bhuvanagiri district of Telangana famous. Telia Rumal cloth involves a number of intricate handmade work with cotton loom displaying a variety of design and motifs in 3 particular colours — Red, Black and White. The process of preparation uses gingelly oil and natural vegetable dye which gives it a distinct and unique quality in the form of its texture and smell. The consortium of Puttapaka handloom cluster had applied for GI tag, on behalf of the artisans involved in the rumal work. Telia Rumals are simple in design, but skilful in application, with the weft, warp and double Ikat technique and geometric designs. Much of these telia fabrics were used by Muslim nobles in Hyderabad. These Rumals were also called Asia Rumal, and thousands of these telia rumals were exported to Persian Gulf, Middle East, Aden, East Africa, Singapore and Burma. Until 1930s these Telia Rumals with geometric pattem were woven in Chirala and the surrounding villages in Guntur. A GI tag insulates the uniqueness of the product from fakes and sets a quality benchmark for the work. Its commercial value and exploitation shall be vested with the applicants, who are usually associations of artisans or government departments, said Sanjai Gandhi, who had filed GI applications for all the three products

[5/21, 16:29] Sanjai Gandhi: https://www.google.co.in/amp/s/m.timesofindia.com/india/tamil-nadus-wood-carvings-pith-works-get-gi-tag-telanganas-telia-rumal-too-gets-status/amp_articleshow/75683891.cms
[5/21, 16:31] Sanjai Gandhi: Thanjavur pith work, arambavoor wood carving, and Telia rumal GI granted by advocate Sanjai gandhi
[5/22, 12:24] Sekarreporter 1: IndiaCoronavirus Cases In IndiaIRCTC Ticket BookingCyclone AmphanZones In Maharashtra
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Tamil Nadu’s wood carvings, pith works get GI tag; Telangana’s Telia Rumal too gets status
A Subramani | TNN | May 11, 2020, 23:55 IST

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CHENNAI: Come Tuesday, two delicate handicraft products from Tamil Nadu – the Thanjavur Netti Works (pith works) and Arambavur Wood Carvings – will get the Georgraphical Indication (GI) from the GI registry. Tamil Nadu handicrafts department is the applicant on behalf of the artisans involved in the trade, said its counsel and IPR attorney P Sanjai Gandhi.
Netti (pith) is obtained from a hydrophyte plant called Aeschynomene Aspera found in lakes and marshy lands around the Thanjavur region and Mannargudi. Traditionally and hereditarily artisans make models of the Brihadeeshwara Temple, Hindu idols, garlands, door hangings and decorative pieces.
READ MORE FROM
As workers prepare to trickle back into offices, here are strategies to keep the virus at bay, as well as guidelines if an employee tests positive

SRK’s six-pack and Salman’s biceps got a lot of Indian men into the gym, but now even the boys want to be buff. Is this teen muscle mania about a good body or body image issues?

The artefact is created out of the pith looks similar to the ones made in marble and elephant’s tusk. They shine elegantly but are brittle and break easily, unless kept carefully. Hence, most models are preserved inside a glass box.
The arumbavur wood carvings is an art form and a temple architecture that draw inspiration from mythology and mythical deities. The Arumbavur artisans employ great skill in measuring geometric proportions and scale of wood and detailing required, from a single block of wood, for various wooden sculptures, from hand-sized carvings to temple chariots and temple cars. Temple cars and chariots are used to carry idols of Hindu gods. The artisans receive an abundant supply of fine wood from Pachamalai Hills and Thanjavur-Kumbakonam belt.

Temple cars (rathas), pooja room interiors, designed doors, panels, temple flagstaff and images of gods are all made by Arumbavur artisans, who are, however, best known for their temple cars.
The third product set to get GI recognition on Tuesday is Telia Rumal, which made the Yadadri Bhuvanagiri district of Telangana famous. Telia Rumal cloth involves a number of intricate handmade work with cotton loom displaying a variety of design and motifs in 3 particular colours — Red, Black and White. The process of preparation uses gingelly oil and natural vegetable dye which gives it a distinct and unique quality in the form of its texture and smell.
The consortium of Puttapaka handloom cluster had applied for GI tag, on behalf of the artisans involved in the rumal work.
Telia Rumals are simple in design, but skilful in application, with the weft, warp and double Ikat technique and geometric designs. Much of these telia fabrics were used by Muslim nobles in Hyderabad. These Rumals were also called Asia Rumal, and thousands of these telia rumals were exported to Persian Gulf, Middle East, Aden, East Africa, Singapore and Burma. Until 1930s these Telia Rumals with geometric pattem were woven in Chirala and the surrounding villages in Guntur.
A GI tag insulates the uniqueness of the product from fakes and sets a quality benchmark for the work. Its commercial value and exploitation shall be vested with the applicants, who are usually associations of artisans or government departments, said Sanjai Gandhi, who had filed GI applications for all the three products

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